Tag Archives: Lion

Victoria Falls

December 19, 2012

Today is our last full day in Africa. We’ve experienced so much – from wine tours to scenic drives to leopard, giraffe, lion, rhino, and elephant encounters – that it feels like we’ve been here for a lifetime. Yet, it’s been so magical that it feels as if no time has passed at all.Leopard

We’ve been completely present here in Africa – no email, no Facebook, no cell phones. This is the longest period of time I’ve been “unplugged” and yet, I feel entirely connected. Monkey babies

We began our day with an excursion to Victoria Falls, one of the seven natural wonders of the world. The width, in conjunction with the height, of Victoria Falls forms the largest sheet of falling water in the world. The spray from the falls often rises more than 1,300 feet. We’ve been able to see the spray from miles away since we’ve  been in Zimbabwe. Victoria Falls

The falls truly are spectacular. We walked about a mile and saw the continuous flow of water the entire length of our walk. In some places it felt like the water was pouring uncontrollably over the edge. In other places, the flow felt more controlled, more consistent. Victoria Falls

Feeding into the falls is the Zambezi River, which looks like a huge, still, flat, body of water. . . until it reaches the edge and forms Victoria Falls. Vic Falls Zambezi

We saw a surprising number of people tempting fate, ignoring the danger warnings, and hanging near the edge of the viewing points. I didn’t experience any fear, but I do have great respect for the power of nature. Watching an elephant knock down a tree directly in front of us and hearing a lion’s roar from nearly 8 kilometers away – all in less than 24 hours – gave me an even greater reverence for nature. IMG_2950

Vic Falls Warning Sign and People

We spent a decent amount of time at Victoria Falls. I found myself spontaneously meditating several times. The sound of the water, along with the balance of beauty and strength, absorbed me. The quietness of my mind was punctuated by the sound of water crashing into the river below.

We learned about geographic changes to the falls in the past, as well as some forthcoming. Each time an island or piece of land falls down with the force of the falls, it changes the landscape and flow patterns of the water. It can take many lifetimes for this to occur, but as our guide described the developments, it was easy to look out at the falls and clearly see what he was describing.

After getting sufficiently soaked from the spray of the falls, we turned to head back to the lodge. On our way out of Victoria Falls park, we came across a large troop of Baboons. We didn’t seen any of the infamous, mischievous Baboons when we were in Cape Town and those we saw during our stay at Lion Sands were not in direct contact with humans. The baboons at Victoria Falls park have a lot of contact with humans and therefore can be quite. . . interesting.

We hadn’t expected to see the baboons, so I was surprised to turn the corner and see a gigantic male, lying spread eagle, with a smile on his face, taking care of some sexual urges, adjacent to the sidewalk. As I turned my head, I saw we were surrounded by baboons. Some of them jumped from tree to tree as we walked by, others approached us on the sidewalk. One baboon was not happy about having his picture taken and jumped out of a tree toward the head of the woman who had a camera in his face.  IMG_9987 IMG_9993 IMG_9998

We left the baboons and boarded our van back to the lodge. As usual, my friend and I weren’t ready to go back to the hotel, so we asked the driver to drop us off at the artists village. The moment we stepped off the van, we were surrounded by artists showing us their works.

I met a man named J.J. who carved a beautiful bird statue out of stone. The man next to him had made various stone sculptures including elephants, leopards, figurines. I wanted to purchase dozens of them. Speaking to the artists and seeing the results of their hard work was amazing. I envisioned carrying my luggage, which had already increased by one duffle bag, during the remaining three flights. Unfortunately, I had to be selective with my purchases.JJ Stone Birds

I bought two stone statues and then went inside a building where dozens of women were selling goods. Some locals had advised us to support the women as much as possible because “they’re the ones who take care of and feed the children.” We took their advice to heart and spent a great deal of time with the women.Wood spoons

I ended up purchasing several sets of carved wooden serving spoons, some wood dishes, stone dishes, and necklaces. Necklaces

At one point, I looked over at my friend and laughed. She had at least 20 handmade bags draped from her arms and was surrounded by women holding up dozens more bags. “Make a decision!” one of the women commanded, jokingly. My friend’s “decision” ended up including 11 bags and several other items she purchased as gifts.

With our hands and our bags full, and our wallets empty, we caught a ride back to the lodge. We laughed as we spread out all of our purchases on our beds. How will we get all of this home?!?dish

Spoons

As most of our days on this trip have been, today was jam packed with activities. Fortunately, we had time to grab a quick bite and a cocktail prior to our sunset river cruise on the Zambezi. We’ve made some good friends on this trip and it was fun to be reunited with them during the river cruise. Everyone was in a celebratory mood, enjoying every last moment of our time in Africa.

When we boarded the boat, we light-heartedly asked for clarification about which direction we’d be traveling. Earlier today, we witnessed the force of the Zambezi River as it rushed over Victoria Falls, we reminded our captains. They quickly soothed us with unlimited cocktails and some appetizers.

As we cruised around the Zambezi, we saw a baby crocodile lounging on the river bank. We were able to pull the boat fairly close to shore so we could observe the little croc for a while. Baby Crocodile

As we continued up the river, we came across several hippos. Our guides informed us that we couldn’t get quite as close to the hippos. They reinforced what we learned at Lion Sands – hippos are very territorial and can become aggressive if you enter their territory.  We watched the hippos from a safe distance and then cruised around the river some more.Hippo

We also saw impala prancing along the river banks and some birds we hadn’t previously seen. Impala

Bird

By the time our river cruise concluded, everybody on board had more than enough drinks. Our next activity was to take part in a special dinner, featuring traditional African food, dance, and drumming. Rather than get dropped off at our rooms, we asked the driver to take us all directly to the Boma, where our dinner would take place.

We were the first ones to arrive at the Boma, so there was only one thing to do – have some drinks at the bar, while we waited for the restaurant to open. The remainder of the night was exceptionally entertaining. We sat at a large table, with the friends we made on the trip. At the instruction of our server, we blindly drank the most disgusting drink any of us had ever tried. We laughed at our ignorance afterwards. “We should have known it wouldn’t be good when he said, ‘don’t smell it’,” our new friend, Ben, reminded us.

We ended up turning the disgusting drink into a phenomenal people-watching game. Each time people sat down to dinner, we watched their faces as they too blindly drank the disgusting drink. It was hysterical to witness the domino effect of their expressions as, one-by-one, they tasted the drink.

The food was served buffet style and there was plenty of it. There were meats and stews that were new to us. Having been adventurous with the drink, some of us were a bit more reserved with the food, veering away from things like the worms. Nonetheless, there was great variety and we were sufficiently fed and hydrated.

As we neared the end of our meal, a group of drummers and dancers came out and performed in the center of the room. Boma Drummers IMG_3162

When we finished our meal, they handed everyone in the restaurant a drum. Have you ever walked into Guitar Center on a Saturday afternoon? Imagine a couple hundred people banging on drums at the same time.

It sounds as if it could be painful, but it was hysterical and a lot of fun. It was amazing to witness how everyone – no matter their age – became a child when they had the drum on their lap. Nobody waited for instruction nor a “go” signal. Everyone just started banging away. Eventually, the leaders reigned us in and had everyone in the restaurant drumming at their command. It was a blast.

When we got back to the room, we looked at our luggage, alongside our numerous additional bags of gifts, and laughed again. We’ll pack up tomorrow. It’s time to get a good night’s sleep. We have 48 hours of travel ahead of us and tonight is the last time we’ll be able to lie in a bed until we get back to Los Angeles.

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Safari Adventures: Lions Roaring, Lightning Strikes, and Coffee With Rhinos

12/16/12

IMG_2829This morning we again woke up before our 5:00 am wake-up call. Prior to arriving at Lion Sands, I mistakenly assumed it would be challenging to wake up so early. As it turns out, the sun begins to rise and the birds begin singing around 4:30 in the morning. Last night we slept with the curtains and glass doors open, so the sounds of the river and the birds, along with the morning light, came pouring through the screen doors this morning.

It’s very peaceful waking up here. The only place I’ve ever felt so calm is at the ocean. Tranquility increases with our growing experiences, as we continually witness the perfection of nature at work. Everything happens as it’s meant to here and there are no distractions to interfere with the experience. There’s no TV – what we witness here isn’t edited or planned. We are simply experiencing the grace and wonder of wildlife and nature. How it all “works” in the  bush is an affirmation of life as a whole.

Although we were headed out on our fourth game drive, we never know what to expect. “What are you taking us to see today?” I asked Landon. “Whatever the bush allows me to show you,” he replied.

As we drove out into the bush, Eddie scanned the road for tracks. He’s constantly scanning the trees, the bush, and the road. He’s totally relaxed, but his focus can’t be broken. A few minutes into our drive, Eddie popped off the vehicle and pointed out the fresh tracks of a male lion.

We followed the tracks for a while, in hopes of spotting the lion. We “poked around” – as Landon often refers to it – for long enough to question whether or not we’d actually find the lion. Then, as we rounded a corner, Eddie raised a finger to to the sky. We all looked up, expecting to see another unique bird. Eddie and Landon laughed hysterically as we looked into the sky. Straight ahead, the male lion was resting in the road. Lion

He was a mature male, with a full mane, the father of the Charleston cubs we’d seen during our first drive. Landon explained that the lion was full from a large meal and was resting while he digested. The lion lounged around for a bit and then made his way to the shade of a tree to cool off and sleep. He was gorgeous. I could have watched him lie there for hours. male lion Sleeping Lion

We continued on our way, but not for long, before coming upon two cape buffalo. These two were grazing and calm.  Further down the road we saw another cape buffalo.  This third buffalo was a very large bull, standing in some bushes alongside the road, solitary. When we drove by he had a look on his face that I’ve never experienced first-hand with an animal. His look was territorial and serious. If an animal could say, “Don’t look at me. Don’t fuck with me. Don’t even think about coming near me,” this buffalo’s expression adequately conveyed it. It was a warning to stay away.

“That’s one buffalo nobody wants to cross,” Landon said, without slowing or stopping the vehicle as we passed.  It was an important reminder that these are wild animals and we are in their territory. Having a good guide is not only nice, it’s crucial. It’s imperative to be with somebody who knows animal behavior and how to keep you safe. Cape Buffalo

We drove a bit further and came upon two young male rhinoceros. they are magnificent and look almost prehistoric. Each time we see the rhinos, I send out a silent prayer that the species is able to continue to thrive, that they remain safe from poachers. Landon said that more than 600 rhinos in the area have been killed by poachers this year. “That’s nearly two a day,” he added.

It’s extremely infuriating to know that people are killing these animals. It’s even more infuriating given the ignorant and senseless “reasons” these animals are being hunted. We were blessed to observe the rhinos for a while. It felt as though everyone in our vehicle shared enormous appreciation of and gratitude for our encounters with the rhinos. rhinos IMG_2857

Eventually, we pulled away for our morning ritual bush coffee and tea break. Eddie and Landon set everything up and started passing out our choice of coffee, tea, hot chocolate, orange juice, and smoothies. They also set out several morning snacks and cereals.

As we stood outside, sharing our perceptions of the adventures so far, Landon said, “the rhinos. . . ” Sure enough, the two male rhinos we’d been observing earlier had come down to check us out. “Not many people can say they’ve had coffee with rhinos,” Landon added.

As the rhinos approached, Landon made sure we were safe, keeping us close to the vehicle and monitoring their behavior. They walked around and looked at us from a distance. Their curiosity was tempered by their tentativeness, but we did share several special minutes together. The tables had turned – we were the center of attention and the animals were the spectators. Rhinos Coffee

After we finished our coffee, Landon and Eddie led us on a bush walk back to the lodge. Along the way they pointed out elephant, leopard, rhino, impala, and tortoise tracks. Eddie explained how to tell the difference between males and females, as well as the direction an animal is headed, solely by looking at its tracks.

Eddie also introduced us to several plants and trees, showing us how they can be transformed into toothpicks, toothbrushes, and fire extinguishers. He explained some of the properties of elephant dung, from headache remedy to mosquito repellent.

Landon pointed out the dung beetle which makes impressive balls out of the dung and uses it for mating and food. “You see how everything gets used in the bush,” Landon noted, highlighting the impressive, natural ecosystem and cycle of life.

“Bracelet time”, Eddie announced. While we were walking and learning, Eddie had been making bracelets for us out of tree bark. He presented one bracelet to each person, specially designed to fit their wrist. Eddie’s thoughtfulness and generosity is another demonstration of the hospitality and kindness of Africa’s people.

We returned to the lodge for breakfast and then went our separate ways to relax before lunch and our afternoon game drive.

An hour before our afternoon game drive we heard the roar of thunder as a downpour began. There was no complaining as we’ve truly lucked out on this trip. We are here during rainy season and this was the first rain we’ve encountered. My friend, Heather, and I sat out on our patio deck, drinking wine, eating cheese, and watching the storm.

We were told the rain may let up prior to our game drive but it did not. I was pleased to see everyone in our group show up for the afternoon game dive, in the rain. “We didn’t come ten thousand miles to sit in the room,” said Ben, another guest and new friend.

Landon and Eddie passed out huge rain ponchos and we set out for a wet, adventurous drive through the bush. We our saw our common friends, the impala, first. All in all, viewing is considerably more difficult in the rain. The animals lay low and take shelter.

Eventually, we came across seven to ten cape buffalo, tucked away, grazing among the trees. We sat and observed them for a while. They looked truly majestic and at ease in the rain. Rain Buffalo

It was pouring rain, with thunder and lightening surrounding us. As we drove through the bush in our open-air vehicle, exposed to the elements, I began to wonder whether I was the only one questioning our decision to go out in this weather. Yet, as soon as the uncertainty began to take form in my mind, the excitement of seizing the moment and fully experiencing life took over. Before I ever had the opportunity to voice concern or a complaint, the words “this is AMAZING!” spilled out of my mouth.

As we poked around the bush some more, we came across a baboon family. The babies played while the adults groomed each other. Baboons IMG_2897

We continued to drive through the bush, amid thunder and lightening, down to the river. We spotted a fresh smoldering brush fire, sparked by lightening. The rain seemed to put the fire out, but we marveled at the smoldering trees.

The rain let up just in time for our happy hour drinks by the river. We stood outside and took in the beauty of the expansive landscape, reflecting on the journey and scheming for ways to extend our trip. I’ve asked everybody who works at the lodge if I can move in with them and they’ve all said, “Yes!”, but we know it will soon be time for the next portion of our journey.IMG_2900

In the distance, I heard a deep, open sounding, rumbling. “What’s that?” I asked Landon. “That’s a lion roaring,” he replied. Several minutes later I heard the distinct sound again. “How far can the sound of a lion’s roar travel?” I asked Landon. “Eight kilometers. It’s quite a distance!” he replied. The ominous sound of lions roaring in the wilderness of Africa is something I hope to remember always.

We jumped back in the vehicle after drinks and the heavy rains started up again. We were quiet and appreciative during the journey back to the lodge. This is our last night at Lion Sands and we wanted to take it all in.

Drinking Our Way Through South Africa

12/11/12 

stellenboschWe woke up early this morning so we’d have time for breakfast prior to the day’s wine tasting adventures.

The package we booked through Lion World Tours included a half-day trip to Stellenbosch, one of South Africa’s famous wine regions. However, we felt that traveling nearly 10,000 miles to South Africa warranted a full day in the Stellenbosch region, so we opted to extend the tour.  South Africa is known for its wine and we wanted to ensure we had ample time to appreciate it.

Our package also includes daily breakfast at More Quarters, where we’re staying. In my previous travel experiences, “breakfast included” equals continental breakfast, which isn’t really my thing.  So I anticipated that this may simply be a snack and that we’d get a “real breakfast” somewhere else.  I am pleased to report that I was entirely wrong. Breakfast at More Quarters is outstanding!

We were escorted to the dining room upstairs by Liz, who works at the front desk, but again, treats us more like old friends than hotel guests.  The dining room is beautiful, open and spacious, with windows on all sides.  There was a wonderful spread of fresh juices, tea, pastries, meats and cheeses, fruits, and cereals.  It was the  most elaborate “continental breakfast” I’d seen.

Next we were handed menus, which included a wonderful selection of egg dishes, as well as sweet items, and create-your-own options.  Breakfast at More Quarters is among the best breakfasts I’ve ever had. I’m already looking forward to tomorrow morning’s meal.

During breakfast I reflected on our day yesterday. I tried to recall my formal education – the lectures and the textbooks.  We were taught about apartheid at some point, I remember that much.  Yet, everything I learned was a “fact” presented on a piece of paper or talked at me by someone who couldn’t lend any first-hand perspective.  I’m grateful for school and I received a wonderful education, but I don’t feel I truly learned about apartheid until I came to Africa and heard about it from people who’ve lived through it.

I snapped out of my daydream and finished breakfast just before our guide, Sharif, arrived to escort us on our wine tour. We made arrangements to go to a few wineries early in the day and then meet up with the half-day group during the latter part of the day.

Fairview Goat GreetingOur wine tasting began at Fairview, known for their wines, cheeses, and goats.  When we arrived, we noticed a male goat sitting peacefully on the top floor of a tower. Shortly thereafter a female goat greeted us.

The GoatfatherWe selected a special tasting that included cheese pairing.  “Colette! It’s 9:15 in the morning and we’re already drinking,” my friend exclaimed, reveling in the absurdity of it all. “Cheers!” I replied, raising my glass.  I had no doubt we’d be able to endure the extended day of wine tasting.

First we were asked to choose either the “traditional path” or the “adventurous path”.  I chose the adventurous path, which allowed me to taste some of the winery’s more unique wines.

With our final glass of wine we were instructed to head over to the cheese tasting area so we could pair the wine with assorted cheeses.  The honey flavored goat cheese was my favorite.  Unfortunately, we’re not allowed to bring any back to the States.

Lion SanctuaryTaking a break from wine, we set off to Cheetah Outreach so we could learn about cheetahs. However, on the way to Cheetah Outreach we noticed a lion sanctuary. Drakenstein Lion Park rescues lions that have been raised in captivity and therefore would not survive in the wild. They rescue lions from circuses and from zoos that are closing down.

Coca Cola Sponsorship of Lion SanctuaryIt appears Coca Cola is a major contributor to the sanctuary.  I was happy to see a large company contributing funds to this important project, for what truly seems to be altruistic reasons.  I don’t imagine Coca Cola gets much global recognition for this effort, but they should.

We finished up at the lion sanctuary and continued on to Cheetah Outreach. Cheetah Outreach does important work to support the well-being of these endangered animals.  During our visit we learned that farmers have been shooting cheetahs who threaten their chickens. In an effort to reduce this, Cheetah Outreach breeds Turkish Anatolian Shepherd dogs and places them on South African farms to guard livestock.

Petting Cheetah JosephCheetah Outreach raises the dogs alongside chickens so that the dogs naturally become protective of the chickens and scare away potential predators. There are fewer than 1,000 cheetahs remaining in South Africa and Cheetah Outreach’s mission is to help ensure their survival in the wild.

While learning about the program, I got to pet an adult male cheetah, named Joseph.  He began purring the moment I touched him.  While I was well aware Joseph is a cat, I hadn’t expected him to purr.  His entire body hummed as we connected peacefully.

After our amazing animal encounters it was time to get back to drinking wine. The knowledgable staff at More Quarters recommended we visit and dine at Tokara.  The view at Tokara was breathtaking and the wine was some of the best I’ve ever had.  I purchased a bottle of their scarce, award-winning 2010 Pinotage which is not available for shipping in the U.S. I also shipped a few bottles of Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet home.

We wanted to stay at Tokara all day, but the time had come for us to meet up with the half-day tour.   We connected with the rest of the group at Ernie Els Wine Reserve.  We took in the beauty of the property as we embarked down another tasting adventure. Ernie Els specializes in red wines.  While tasting, we learned that the vineyards are carefully arranged according to wind patterns, to minimize damage from high winds.

Ernie Ells Private CellarJust as our group was about to leave, another group was headed down for a tour of Ernie Els’ private cellar.  We spoke with both guides, as well as the staff at Ernie Els, and arranged to stay behind for the special tour.

The group of people we connected with on this portion of the tour were quite spirited and, like us, not quite ready to call it quits.  We asked our guide if we could stop by another winery rather than head back to the hotel.  Much to everyone’s delight, he obliged. We shared a lot of laughs – as well as several bathroom and water stops – with this fun group of people, solidifying several new friendships.

Still not ready to return home, we asked our wonderful guide if he’d drop us off at Mama Africa for traditional African food and live music.  Our new wine-enthusiast friends, Les and Dana, joined us and we had an absolutely amazing time.  The place was packed and it took 2 hours for our food to arrive, which meant nothing more than we had 2 additional hours to drink. We tried some new beers, various speciality shots, and some traditional cocktails.

A really fun live band called Abakhaya performed throughout the night.  I shot some video to share with you, but upon further review it turns out 16 hours of drinking does little for my cinematography skills.  You’ll just have to travel to Cape Town to see them. . . or take my word for it.

Off to bed.  Tomorrow is another full day of adventure as we embark on the famous Cape Point drive.